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A Camel Through A Needle's Eye
Mark 10:25

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Posted by Steve Caruso , updated Tuesday, August 20, 2002 8:29 AM

 

"It is simpler for a camel to go through a needle's eye, then for a man of wealth to come into the Kingdom of God." -Mark 10:25

The bold area, in Greek, reads "καμηλον" (kamélon) which is the accusative form of "καμηλος" (kamélos). This word, in greek, only means "camel" and sometimes can mean "pack animal" however, if we take a look at it's Aramaic equivalent, we find the word "ܓܱܡܠܴܐ" (gémla) is the only word in Aramaic to describe a generic camel (without getting specific, ie we have the words "colt," "foal," "mare," and "stallion," to describe types of horses, but one general word for the species, "horse").

However, "ܓܱܡܠܴܐ" (gémla), has a double meaning! As Aramaic evolved seperately from Hebrew, it picked up new idioms and meanings to it's vocabluary. "ܓܱܡܠܴܐ" (gémla) is a perfect example, for Aramaic speaking peoples fashioned a rough, thick rope from camel's hair that had a very decent tensile strength, and after a while, it became to be known as, you guessed it, "ܓܱܡܠܴܐ" (gémla). For example, modern-day society has the same phenomena where a product or item is referred to by the first name intorduced, reguardless of what brand it is. Millions of Americans still ask for a "Kleenex" instead of a tissue, the word for "razor" in Brazil is "Gilette," and an "IBM Computer" still refers to any Windows-compatable machine.

"I've found a quote given by a 10th-century Aramaic lexicographer whose name was Bar-Bahlul. He produced an Aramaic dictionary and in it is the following comment for "Gamla":

"Gamla is a thick rope which is used to bind ships"

Considering that Jesus was speaking to fishermen, this meaning of Gamla seems more appropriate, and I think is a fantastic proof that the Greek was translated from an Aramaic [original.]" -Paul Younan

 

 

Everything © 2002 Steve Caruso unless otherwise noted.
Please feel free to use this for private or public use, just send me an email first! :-)


 


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